George A Romero

Romero could be described as the father of the modern horror film. In 1968 he made the incredible Night of the Living Dead, a film which pushed the boundaries and paved the way for a whole new genre. Despite the criticism the film received, largely for the level of violence, the $100,000 budget was made back several times over.

Born in 1940, in New York, Romero had studied film and worked hard to scrape together the cash for his first feature. He was soon typecast as a horror director a reputation he lived up to with the phenomenal success of his second zombie film Dawn of the Dead. Romero's work is elevated above the usual sensationalist horrors because it often has a point to make, a social commentary with a satricial sting in the tail.

The final part of what people assumed to be a trilogy was the badly received Day of the Dead and this seemed to mark a decline in George's career. However after years of trying to work out a deal with the Hollywood sharks, the success of recent zombie films like 28 Days Later and Shaun of the Dead paved the way for Romero to return with the recent Land of the Dead.

George A Romero is an incredibly creative, inventive and skilled director. He is an expert at building tension, he is a clever writer and he has been a source of inspiration for a whole generation of horror film makers. His most recent zombie film proves he has not lost any of his talent and we can only hope there are more to come.

George A Romero